COMET webinar series on May 28 2020

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COMET webinar series on May 28 2020

Post by salsinawi » Sun May 17, 2020 4:32 pm

https://comet.nerc.ac.uk/


Centre for the Observation and Modelling of Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Tectonics



WELCOME TO COMET
The Centre for Observation and Modelling of Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Tectonics (COMET) is a NERC Centre of Excellence that uses satellite measurements alongside ground-based observations and geophysical models to study earthquakes and volcanoes, and help understand the hazards they pose.
Since April 2014, we have been working in partnership with the British Geological Survey (BGS) to deliver cutting-edge research on earthquakes and volcanoes as well as hazard monitoring services. We also work closely with the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO) and European Space Agency (ESA), as well as many other national and international partners.
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Watch the latest COMET webinar
Watch Jessica Hawthorne COMET Webinar from Tuesday 21st of April 2020: Which fault zone processes could cause slow earthquakes? Constraints from scaling and atmospheric modulation

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Latest News
COMET has been awarded £950,000 by NERC to deliver cutting-edge research on earthquakes and volcanoes and to continue the development of hazard monitoring services.
NERC officially announced the new funding for COMET on Wednesday 29 May 2019. This will enable ambitious, large-scale science which helps us to understand global change and natural disasters over the next two years.You can read more about the award, and National Capability, on the NERC website.
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Dear Colleagues,


The Centre for Observation and Modelling of Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Tectonics (COMET) invites you to the next instalment of our webinar series, viewable from the home office.



Dr. Tamarah King (University of Oxford)

Movers and shakers down-under: what Australian surface ruptures tell us about intraplate faults, seismic hazard, and reverse earthquake strong ground motions.

The webinar will take place on Thursday the 28th of May 2020 at 16:00 UK time (GMT+1).

If you want to attend the webinar please register at https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/registe ... O6PTDUyyIQ
(After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information on how to join the webinar)


Abstract
Australian earthquakes offer unique opportunities to investigate surface effects of reverse rupturing faults. Eleven historic surface-rupturing earthquakes (MW 4.7 – 6.6) have occurred since 1968 in arid, low-relief, bedrock dominated areas with little to no anthropogenic influence. These events provide inputs for many intraplate and global scaling relationships, yet remote-sensing techniques and reassessment of published historic data raises questions regarding how to define fault length, offset and width values, with implications for the accuracy of scaling relationships reliant on these inputs. Available geological and geophysical data from ten of these events indicate that rupture propagated parallel to the trace of, and possibly along, pre-existing Precambrian bedrock structures, with no unambiguous geological evidence for preceding surface-rupturing earthquakes. The apparent lack of recurrence on historically rupturing faults has implications for how 'active' faults and 'slip-rates' are defined for seismic hazard analysis in intraplate stable continental regions, and raises questions for how strain accumulates and dissipates in these crustal settings. Finally, in the absence of near-field instrumentation, the direction and distances of 1,437 co-seismically displaced rock fragments (chips) provide a dense proxy-record of strong ground motion directionality in the near-field of a MW 6.1 earthquake in Central Australia.


Best wishes,
Daniel Juncu & Fabien Albino
COMET - Centre for the Observation and Modelling of Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Tectonics
https://comet.nerc.ac.uk/
@NERC_COMET
COMET webinars on youtube


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